REVIEW: Riding Lessons by Sara Gruen

riding lessonsFormat:  Paperback
Genre:  General Fiction / Equine Fiction
ISBN:  978-0-06-124108-6
Published:  2004

Rating:  3 out of 5 stars

Back of the Book Blurb:

As a world-class equestrian and Olympic contender, Annemarie Zimmer lived for the thrill of flight atop a strong, graceful animal. Then, at eighteen, a tragic accident destroyed her riding career and Harry, the beautiful horse she cherished. Now, twenty years later, Annemarie is coming home to her dying father’s New Hampshire horse farm. Jobless and abandoned, she is bringing her troubled teenage daughter to this place of pain and memory, where ghosts of an unresolved youth still haunt the fields and stables—and where hope lives in the eyes of the handsome, gentle veterinarian Annemarie loved as a girl . . . and in the seductive allure of a trainer with a magic touch.

But everything will change yet again with one glimpse of a white striped gelding startlingly similar to the one Annemarie lost in another lifetime. And an obsession is born that could shatter her fragile world.

My Thoughts (**spoiler**):

Well, I didn’t love it and I didn’t hate it. I found it disappointing after having read Water for Elephants a few years back, which I loved. I pretty much disliked every single character in Riding Lessons…which makes you wonder why I went on and read Flying Changes. I found AnneMarie to be ridiculously immature for a woman of 38 years, married 18 years and mother to teenage daughter. She doesn’t seem to have outgrown her own adolescence, and maybe that was a direct result of her career-ending accident when she was 18, but her seeming inability to admit her weaknesses and learn lessons from them was very frustrating. Add to that the once overbearing father who is now dying – and with whom there are unresolved issues, an iron-fisted mother who is intrusive and continues to parent her daughter as if she were still an adolescent, and Eva, with a huge attitude and a smart mouth.

I suppose a woman who has not yet resolved issues with her own parents can not be expected to be a mature, effective parent to a daughter just like herself. Particularly when she is going through a divorce from a cheating husband, a husband whom her daughter adores, and who therefore blames the split on AnneMarie. Still, there does come a point when big girl panties are necessary.

**spoiler**

As much as I disliked almost every character, the book did have some redeeming aspects to it. I related very much to AnneMarie’s devotion to finding the truth of Hurrah’s lineage, and what really happened to him. I also appreciated that, in the end, AnneMarie recognized how much damage she had done, and used her own money to set it right. She was so selfish and had blinders to everything except what was immediately in front of her for so long, that I was gratified to see her make this very real effort, since she had basically run the stable into the ground.

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