REVIEW: Flying Changes by Sara Gruen

flying changesFormat:  Paperback
Genre:  General Fiction / Equine Fiction
ISBN:  978-0-06-124109-3
Published:  2005

Rating:  3 out of 5 stars

Back of the Book Blurb:

Anxiety rules Annemarie Zimmer’s days—the fear that her relationship with the man she loves is growing stagnant; the fear that equestrian daughter Eva’s dreams of Olympic glory will carry her far away from her mother . . . and into harm’s way. For five months, Annemarie has struggled to make peace with her past. But if she cannot let go, the personal battles she has won and the heights she has achieved will have all been for naught.

It is a time of change at Maple Brook horse farm, when loves must be confronted head-on and fears must be saddled and broken. But it is an unanticipated tragedy that will most drastically alter the fragile world of one remarkable family—even as it flings open gates that have long confined them, enabling them all to finally ride headlong and free.

My Thoughts:

I always find it interesting to read reviews after I have finished a book, especially if I am having a difficult time articulating my reactions to the book. In this case, I found the reviews highly informative, most noticeably because there was very little middle ground on this novel. The vast majority of reviewers either loved it or hated it, so I find myself in the minority here.

I read Riding Lessons immediately prior to Flying Changes, and were it not for the redeeming factors in that book (noted in my review), I may not have pushed forward. That, and unless I truly hate something, I am often compelled to get to the end of the story…and clearly the end of the story was not at the end of Riding Lessons. And I’m glad I did, because this book had, in the end, more to redeem it than Riding Lessons did.

Amazing to me was that I grew to like Mutti, and to understand her better. AnneMarie continued to be a collossally immature trainwreck until very near the end of the book, when a convergence of several factors forced her to step up and be an adult. Thankfully there was a good support system surrounding her, because otherwise it’s hard to fathom that there was any hope she could actually do it. Eva continued in her truant ways, and frankly, it was understandable considering how little her mother seemed capable of mothering her. It was never AnneMarie who dropped the hammer on her, but Mutti (or Dan). I am not an iron-fisted parent by far, but I do believe in setting limits, and disciplining disobedience and defiance, so I found AnneMarie’s inability to handle Eva frustrating, even after accounting for a divorce and a seemingly absent father (who started a new family with his new wife).

Still, in the end, she (AnneMarie) redeemed herself. She got hold of her irrational fear…at least, enough to keep from derailing her daughter’s ambitions. She also pulled herself together when there was no other choice, and considering her track record, I was relieved and gratified by that. Had she not, I am certain I would have heaved the book across the room with curses following. It’s not a ringing endorsement, but if you’re a horse person with a reasonably forgiving nature for irrational, unlikeable characters who may or may not change, then you’ll like this book.

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